English (ENGL)

ENGL 110. College Composition I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Qualifying placement score or previous successful completion of, ASC 96.
Typically Offered: FASPSU
This course offers students guided practice in a variety of descriptive-narrative and expository forms, related reviews of grammar and standard usage, and reading and discussion related to these activities. Library research is incorporated into this course.

ENGL 120. College Composition II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: FASPSU
This second course in the composition sequence continues and reinforces the writing skills practiced in ENGL 110, emphasizing library research and the writing of analytical and argumentative papers making use of the thesis-support format and MLA style used in a variety of academic disciplines. Students focus on language through literature and/or film by writing, reading, responding, viewing, and discussing. During spring semester, several sections of ENGL 120 focus on Film as Literature.

ENGL 125. Introduction to Professional Writing

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: FASPSU
In ENGL 125, students continue the writing process and research skills practiced in ENGL 110, concentrating on the style, content, and format of business and technical writing. Students analyze and complete a variety of writing projects typical of a professional setting.

ENGL 192. Experimental Course

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An experimental course is one that is being tested to determine its suitability for inclusion in the course catalog. Testing may continue for two semesters, after which the course should be discontinued or approved through the established college procedures, assigned a permanent course number and title, and included in the master catalog.

ENGL 194. Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An independent study course is one designed jointly by the student and faculty member to address an advanced topic of particular interest to the student and in the instructor's field of expertise. The course, when developed, must be approved by the department chair as being relevant to the discipline and of sufficient rigor for the credits to be awarded.

ENGL 195. Service Learning

Credits: 1
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Designed to increase off-campus community involvement and awareness of civic responsibility, Service Learning gives students the opportunity to earn up to six semester hours of college credit while pursuing volunteer activities that have positive impact in the community. Some examples of activities that may serve as vehicles for Service Learning include: volunteer work at non-profit organizations (e.g., Kiwanis, Lions, etc.); serving as unpaid interns in local and state government; and organizing and participating in activities that are beneficial to the community as a whole (e.g. spring clean-up drives, neighborhood watch programs, meals-on-wheels, etc.). Students interested in Service Learning should discuss options with their academic advisors and/or faculty in areas related to the proposed activity.

ENGL 196. Study Tour

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Study Tour courses provide students with unique learning opportunities in locations, either foreign or domestic. These learning opportunities should be directly related to the academic field of study under which credits are to be awarded. Some students may not qualify for study tours if their travel abroad is restricted for legal reasons.

ENGL 197. Cooperative Education/Internship

Credits: 1-3
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Cooperative education and internships provide students with real-world experience in business and industry as they explore careers or gain experience in chosen fields of study. The work experiences must be directly related to the discipline under which the credits are to be awarded.

ENGL 199. Special Topics

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Special topics courses are developed by the faculty member to take advantage of unique learning opportunities that either are not repeatable (such as a presidential election) or address advanced topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Topics covered must be directly related to the discipline under which credits are to be awarded.

ENGL 205. English Usage I

Credits: 2
Corequisite: Recommended but not required - COMM 281.
Typically Offered: FALL
Review of structure, syntax, diction, and rhetoric in order to develop increasingly effective skills for written communication.

ENGL 206. English Usage II

Credits: 2
Corequisite: Recommended but not required - COMM 281.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The second course in grammar study continues and reinforces the skills learned in ENGL 205. In addition, students will gain a more effective and eloquent writing style by practicing connotation, clarity, specificity, sound, sentence variety and figures of speech. How ideas are coordinated and subordinated is also crucial to this course.

ENGL 211. Introduction to Creative Writing (Fiction)

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
This course concentrates on the techniques valuable to writers of fiction by providing master literary works to read and respond to. As students practice their own craft, they will reflect on and interpret the human cultural tradition. Students will benefit from both individual and group feedback.

ENGL 213. Literary Publications

Credits: 3
Typically Offered: SPRING
This course is an introduction to creative magazine publishing. Students will produce Figments of Imagination, the campus literary and arts journal. Students will learn how to solicit manuscript and visual art entries; screen, select and edit pieces; and design, lay out and publish the journal. Students also will take part in grant writing, establishing a campus and Web presence for the journal, organizing open mic nights, public readings and collaborative musical performances, and distributing the finished project.

ENGL 221. Introduction to Drama

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
A survey of the world's greatest dramatic literature from Greek times to present. The history of playhouses and stagecraft and other related arts of the theatre are observed in connection with the study of world masterpieces.

ENGL 222. Introduction to Poetry

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: SPRING
Students will read, write, and discuss poetry to gain an appreciation and understanding of the elements of poetry.

ENGL 233. Fantasy and Science Fiction

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: FALL
Study of science fiction and fantasy literature, with an emphasis on those works that have influenced conventional themes within the genre and the manner in which these themes have continued to evolve to incorporate and address contemporary implications and anxieties concerning the impact of science and technology.

ENGL 236. Women and Literature

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: SPRING
This course provides an opportunity for the study of fiction and nonfiction by well-known female authors, such as Kate Chopin, Jane Austen, Zora Neale Hurston, and Eudora Welty. Through the readings of short stories, novels, plays, essays, and poetry, students will explore the literary achievements of female authors as well as the social conditions that influenced their lives and works. Authors and selections will vary from semester to semester.

ENGL 238. Children's Literature

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 110 and ENGL 120.
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
This course is an introductory survey of literature for children from infancy through puberty. Through the readings of picture books, poetry, folklore, fantasy, realistic fiction, biography, and informational books, students will gain an awareness of the history, genre, and theme in children's literature and develop an enjoyment and appreciation of children's literature. In their reading, students will also develop a familiarity with important authors and illustrators as they confront such issues as racism, sexism, multiculturalism, and censorship.

ENGL 251. British Literature I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: FALL
Exploring selected works from Beowulf through the 18th century, this lecture/discussion course provides students with an introduction to British literature and a background useful in the study of other literature and cultural history. Students will read a variety of works and authors including Chaucer, Marlowe, Milton, Donne, and Swift.

ENGL 252. British Literature II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: SPRING
Exploring selected works from the Romantic period into the 20th century, this lecture/discussion course provides students with an introduction to British literature and a background useful in the study of other literature and cultural history. Students will read a variety of writers including Blake, Wordsworth, Austen, Keats, Tennyson, the Brontes, Browning, Wilde, and Hardy.

ENGL 261. American Literature I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: FALL
This course charts the historical, cultural, and literary evolution of the American nation. Beginning with the verbal and written art of America's first inhabitants, American Indians, the records of European explorers and the writings of colonial settlers, students study masterful works of writers such as Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.

ENGL 262. American Literature II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: SPRING
Students study representative works of major American writers from the Civil War to the present. Every age in every culture grapples with the essential questions of who we are and what our nature is. The ideas posed by these authors allow learning about history, culture, and life in America. ENGL 261 is not a prerequisite for this course.

ENGL 271. Literary Analysis

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 and ENGL120.
Typically Offered: SPRING
This course is an introduction to contemporary modes of literary criticism with an emphasis on applying conventional approaches to analyzing literary texts.

ENGL 278. Alternative Literature

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Typically Offered: SPRING
This course will look at literary works such as detective stories, fantasies, science fiction, ethnic and beat literature that have, at times, been judged as lesser works than classical literature. Using a multidisciplinary approach, this course will isolate 20th century works in separate genres and analyze them through the elements they share with high literature.

ENGL 292. Experimental Course

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An experimental course is one that is being tested to determine its suitability for inclusion in the course catalog. Testing may continue for two semesters, after which the course should be discontinued or approved through the established college procedures, assigned a permanent course number and title, and included in the master catalog.

ENGL 294. Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An independent study course is one designed jointly by the student and faculty member to address an advanced topic of particular interest to the student and in the instructor's field of expertise. The course, when developed, must be approved by the department chair as being relevant to the discipline and of sufficient rigor for the credits to be awarded.

ENGL 296. Study Tour

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Study Tour courses provide students with unique learning opportunities in locations, either foreign or domestic. These learning opportunities should be directly related to the academic field of study under which credits are to be awarded. Some students may not qualify for study tours if their travel abroad is restricted for legal reasons.

ENGL 297. Cooperative Education/Internship

Credits: 1-3
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Cooperative education and internships provide students with real-world experience in business and industry as they explore careers or gain experience in chosen fields of study. The work experiences must be directly related to the discipline under which the credits are to be awarded.

ENGL 299. Special Topics

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Special topics courses are developed by the faculty member to take advantage of unique learning opportunities that either are not repeatable (such as a presidential election) or address advanced topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Topics covered must be directly related to the discipline under which credits are to be awarded.