Electronics/Telecommunications Technology

LIMITED ENROLLMENT
Delivery method: On campus
Program begins: Fall only

Program Description

The Electronics/Telecommunications Technology program at BSC is a degree program offered on campus. It provides students with a good basic electronics background, as well as specialization in analog and digital telecommunications, copper and fiber optic media, radio communications, and digital electronics. Coursework contains four semesters of digital electronics and classes in AC and direct current analysis, solid state and active devices, electronic communications and telecommunications.

The program is intense and directly applicable to the job market. Study includes classroom instruction and work in a well-equipped modern laboratory. BSC maintains contacts in the electronic and telecommunications industries and provides assistance with job placement.

Preparation

Students considering Electronics/Telecommunications Technology should have good reading comprehension and aptitude for math. High school algebra, physics, basic computer literacy and good reading skills are helpful.

Continuing education after graduation is common to keep up with changes in technology and service procedures.

Program Requirements

Students who complete the degree plan requirements earn an Associate in Applied Science.

Required program entrance scores:

  • ACCUPLACER Math - 41 (elementary algebra)
  • ACT Math - 16
  • COMPASS Math - 34 (pre-algebra)

Admission to BSC does not automatically guarantee an applicant’s acceptance into the program. Electronics/Telecommunications Technology requires students to obtain specific placement scores and to complete an interview before entering the program.

Special Costs

A $100 deposit, required upon acceptance into the program, is applied toward tuition. Fee is non-refundable if you decide not to attend BSC.

Career Opportunities

Electronics/Telecommunications technicians are in vital demand. The field is among the fastest growing occupations requiring college education, but less than a bachelor’s degree. Virtually every industry has some electronic aspect to its operations. Manufacturing, information technology, servicing, processing and telecommunications industries will continue to need skilled workers to install, maintain and repair increasingly complex systems.

Career opportunities include manufacturing technician, calibration technician, network technician, factory service technician, troubleshooter, specialist, manufacturer’s sales representative, maintenance supervisor, service manager, wholesaler/retailer of electronic equipment, business owner.

 

Contact

Mike Holman • Career Academy 252
701-224-5591
Mike.Holman@bismarckstate.edu

ELEC 100. Direct Current Analysis

Credits: 4
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 100L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The study of the concepts of current, voltage and resistance through problem solving and schematic drawings as they apply to DC circuits analysis.

ELEC 100L. Direct Current Analysis Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 100 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 114. Digital Electronics I

Credits: 3
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 114L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The study of number systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, and combination logic circuits.

ELEC 114L. Digital Electronics I Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 114 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 115. Digital Electronics II

Credits: 3
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 115L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The study of arithmetic circuits, code converters, decoders, encoders, multiplexers, demultiplexers, multivibrators, and flip-flops.

ELEC 115L. Digital Electronics II Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 115 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provide hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 118. Solid State Devices I

Credits: 4
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 118L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The study of semiconductor physics, fundamentals of semiconductors, power supplies, transistors, characteristics of biasing circuits, amplifier properties, and FET characteristics and applications.

ELEC 118L. Solid State Devices I Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 118 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 120. AC Analysis

Credits: 4
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 120L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The study of dB, complex numbers, RC, RI and RLC circuits, resonance, and passive and active filters.

ELEC 120L. AC Analysis Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 120 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 130. Active Devices

Credits: 4
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 130L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The study of various electronic devices and circuitry including; Thyristors, Operational Amplifiers, and Regulated Power Supplies.

ELEC 130L. Active Devices Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 130 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 192. Experimental Course

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An experimental course is one that is being tested to determine its suitability for inclusion in the course catalog. Testing may continue for two semesters, after which the course should be discontinued or approved through the established college procedures, assigned a permanent course number and title, and included in the master catalog.

ELEC 194. Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An independent study course is one designed jointly by the student and faculty member to address an advanced topic of particular interest to the student and in the instructor's field of expertise. The course, when developed, must be approved by the department chair as being relevant to the discipline and of sufficient rigor for the credits to be awarded.

ELEC 195. Service Learning

Credits: 1
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Designed to increase off-campus community involvement and awareness of civic responsibility, Service Learning gives students the opportunity to earn up to six semester hours of college credit while pursuing volunteer activities that have positive impact in the community. Some examples of activities that may serve as vehicles for Service Learning include: volunteer work at non-profit organizations (e.g., Kiwanis, Lions, etc.); serving as unpaid interns in local and state government; and organizing and participating in activities that are beneficial to the community as a whole (e.g. spring clean-up drives, neighborhood watch programs, meals-on-wheels, etc.). Students interested in Service Learning should discuss options with their academic advisors and/or faculty in areas related to the proposed activity.

ELEC 196. Study Tour

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Study Tour courses provide students with unique learning opportunities in locations, either foreign or domestic. These learning opportunities should be directly related to the academic field of study under which credits are to be awarded. Some students may not qualify for study tours if their travel abroad is restricted for legal reasons.

ELEC 197. Cooperative Education/Internship

Credits: 1-3
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Cooperative education and internships provide students with real-world experience in business and industry as they explore careers or gain experience in chosen fields of study. The work experiences must be directly related to the discipline under which the credits are to be awarded.

ELEC 199. Special Topics

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Special topics courses are developed by the faculty member to take advantage of unique learning opportunities that either are not repeatable (such as a presidential election) or address advanced topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Topics covered must be directly related to the discipline under which credits are to be awarded.

ELEC 216. Digital Electronics III

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: Completion of first year Electronics/ Telecommunications Technology program, or equivalent and departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 216L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
An extension of ELEC 115, a study of advanced integrated circuits. Topics covered are registers, processors, memory and a study of microcontrollers. Each student will have a laptop and a BASIC STAMP microcontroller which will be used as a training tool for interfacing devices in a digital world.

ELEC 216L. Digital Electronics III Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisite: Completion of first year Electronics/Telecommunications Technology or departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 216 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 218. Digital Electronics IV

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: ELEC 216 and ELEC 216L or equivalent and departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 218L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
A continuation of ELEC 216, students will become familiar with the architecture, programming, application and troubleshooting of micro-controller circuits. A to D and D to A converters are covered. Basic data acquisition theory and practices are also discussed. The BASIC STAMP will be used to interface with mechanical and optical switches, remote radio control and DC motor monitor/control circuits.

ELEC 218L. Digital Electronics IV Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: ELEC 216 and ELEC 216L or equivalent and departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of ELEC 218 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 222. Electronic Communications I

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: Completion of first year Electronics/Telecommunications Technology program or equivalent and departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of ELEC 222L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
Review of reactive and resonant circuits. Circuits used to generate and detect amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Power, current and voltage relationships in an AM and FM wave. Phase relationship between carrier and sidebands. Circuits used to generate and detect amplitude and frequency modulation. Power, current and voltage relationships in an AM and FM wave. Phase relationship between carrier and sidebands.

ELEC 222L. Electronics Communications I Lab

Credits: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 222 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 224. Electronic Communications II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: ELEC 222 and ELEC 222L or equivalent and departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 224L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
Topics covered are transmitter circuits, receiver circuits, antennas and transmission lines.

ELEC 224L. Electronics Communications II Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: ELEC 222 and ELEC 222L.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 224 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The lab portion of the course is a lab/lecture, which provides hands-on verification of the theory presented in class.

ELEC 232. Telecommunications I

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: Completion of first year Electronics/Telecommunications Technology or departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 232L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
This course introduces a basic telephone local loop and the tests that are performed on it. A basic series DC circuit allows students not only an introduction into the access circuit, but is a good review of basic DC circuits in a real world application. Students use specialized test equipment to perform measurements of voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and noise and circuit length. Students also are be introduced to cable location and ground fault location. An outdoor practice field is used for the student's hands-on tasks. Additional topics covered are the Public Switched Telephone Network, customer premise equipment, analog and digital transmission.

ELEC 232L. Telecommunications I Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisite: Completion of first year Electronics/Telecommunications Technology program, or equivalent and departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 232 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: FALL
The lab portion of the course is a lecture/lab that provides hands-on verification of the theory and concepts presented in the lecture class. Activities include underground cable location, cable ground fault location, determining the length of a line using a subscriber loop test set using the capacitance method and using a time domain reflectometer. Line and cable color code are also covered.

ELEC 234. Telecommunications II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: ELEC 232 and ELEC 232L or departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 234L or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
This course is involved with the introductory study of newer technologies other than the plain old telephone service. Topics covered are T carrier, packet switching, FTTx, PON, VOIP, LAN topologies, IPv4, IPv6 and Ethernet.

ELEC 234L. Telecommunications II Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: ELEC 232 and ELEC 232L or departmental approval.
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in, or previous successful completion of, ELEC 234 or departmental approval.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The lab portion of the course provides hands-on practice opportunities for the students in the following areas: connectorizing and testing of Ethernet copper cable; connectorizing and testing of adhesive, crimp-on and fuse-on fiber optic connectors; mechanical splicing, fusion splicing and testing of fiber optic cable. Students become familiar with the operation and use of OTDR, visual fault locator, calibrated light source/power meter, fusion splicer and connector inspection microscope for fiber cable. The students work on a simulated telephone system comprised of two PBXs with both analog and VOIP capabilities. The students also work on a FTTx system that transports data through a PON to each lab bench. Students perform systems checks and troubleshooting on both systems.

ELEC 292. Experimental Course

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An experimental course is one that is being tested to determine its suitability for inclusion in the course catalog. Testing may continue for two semesters, after which the course should be discontinued or approved through the established college procedures, assigned a permanent course number and title, and included in the master catalog.

ELEC 294. Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An independent study course is one designed jointly by the student and faculty member to address an advanced topic of particular interest to the student and in the instructor's field of expertise. The course, when developed, must be approved by the department chair as being relevant to the discipline and of sufficient rigor for the credits to be awarded.

ELEC 296. Study Tour

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Study Tour courses provide students with unique learning opportunities in locations, either foreign or domestic. These learning opportunities should be directly related to the academic field of study under which credits are to be awarded. Some students may not qualify for study tours if their travel abroad is restricted for legal reasons.

ELEC 297. Cooperative Education/Internship

Credits: 1-3
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Cooperative education and internships provide students with real-world experience in business and industry as they explore careers or gain experience in chosen fields of study. The work experiences must be directly related to the discipline under which the credits are to be awarded.

ELEC 299. Special Topics

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Special topics courses are developed by the faculty member to take advantage of unique learning opportunities that either are not repeatable (such as a presidential election) or address advanced topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Topics covered must be directly related to the discipline under which credits are to be awarded.