Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

GIS 105. Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CSCI 101 or a working knowledge of Microsoft Windows.
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
The course provides an introduction to Geographic Information Systems, including how GIS is used for integrating and analyzing spatial data to visualize relationships, seek explanations, and develop solutions to problems. Emphasis is placed on the nature of geographic information, and the ways in which digital methods support geographic analysis. The course is divided between lecture and lab sessions.

GIS 107. GIS Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: GIS 105.
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
The course provides hands-on opportunities to experience the hardware and software used in GIS. The course applies fundamental GIS concepts to creating, editing, and querying spatial data and spatial relationships. Students manipulate data and make decisions from the presented information through various geoprocessing techniques.

GIS 192. Experimental Course

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An experimental course is one that is being tested to determine its suitability for inclusion in the course catalog. Testing may continue for two semesters, after which the course should be discontinued or approved through the established college procedures, assigned a permanent course number and title, and included in the master catalog.

GIS 194. Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An independent study course is one designed jointly by the student and faculty member to address an advanced topic of particular interest to the student and in the instructor's field of expertise. The course, when developed, must be approved by the department chair as being relevant to the discipline and of sufficient rigor for the credits to be awarded.

GIS 195. Service Learning

Credits: 1
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Designed to increase off-campus community involvement and awareness of civic responsibility, Service Learning gives students the opportunity to earn up to six semester hours of college credit while pursuing volunteer activities that have positive impact in the community. Some examples of activities that may serve as vehicles for Service Learning include: volunteer work at non-profit organizations (e.g., Kiwanis, Lions, etc.); serving as unpaid interns in local and state government; and organizing and participating in activities that are beneficial to the community as a whole (e.g. spring clean-up drives, neighborhood watch programs, meals-on-wheels, etc.). Students interested in Service Learning should discuss options with their academic advisors and/or faculty in areas related to the proposed activity.

GIS 196. Study Tour

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Study Tour courses provide students with unique learning opportunities in locations, either foreign or domestic. These learning opportunities should be directly related to the academic field of study under which credits are to be awarded. Some students may not qualify for study tours if their travel abroad is restricted for legal reasons.

GIS 197. Cooperative Education/Internship

Credits: 1-3
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Cooperative education and internships provide students with real-world experience in business and industry as they explore careers or gain experience in chosen fields of study. The work experiences must be directly related to the discipline under which the credits are to be awarded.

GIS 199. Special Topics

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Special topics courses are developed by the faculty member to take advantage of unique learning opportunities that either are not repeatable (such as a presidential election) or address advanced topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Topics covered must be directly related to the discipline under which credits are to be awarded.

GIS 201. Advanced GIS Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: GIS 105 and GIS 107.
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
An advanced hands-on application course designed to extend GIS knowledge and experience and to prepare students in becoming self-sufficient GIS technicians. The course follows a hands-on, problem-solving approach that integrates the interests and analytical needs of participating students. The course will be divided between lecture and lab sessions.

GIS 204. Mobile & Web GIS

Credits: 3
Typically Offered: FALL
The emergence of highly capable mobile devices and applications has opened new opportunity for location based services. Apps enable us to collect and analyze data wherever and whenever we are. Mobile apps are generally classified into web apps and native apps. This course covers how to use mobile GIS apps to collect, maintain and process data. Students will create web maps and web apps using field collected data.

GIS 206. GIS in Science, Agriculture and Business

Credits: 3
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
The course integrates the fields of business, agriculture, and science through GIS and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). The course will be divided between lecture, guest speakers who are experts in their fields, and lab sessions that apply fundamental concepts associated with how GIS can complement business, agricultural, and science applications.

GIS 215. Introduction to Remote Sensing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: GIS 105 & GIS 107.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The course integrates the disciplines of GIS, photogrammetry, and remote sensing. Basic understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum and the physical interaction of light with common earth objects are taught alongside technical skills to apply the concepts. A hands-on real world work flow approach provides experience creating and manipulating both vector and raster data. The course culminates in a project using satellite images to track land cover/land use changes over time. Learning image classification applications and elements of the spatial analyst tool kit are vital to many functions of GIS Analysts. Concepts of spatial analysis are presented through raster math and map algebra. Students will work together to solve environmental problems through individual or group projects.

GIS 225. GIS Project Development and Management

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: GIS 105.
Typically Offered: FALLSPR
GIS 225 focuses on developing GIS project skills. Students gain experience in the definition, planning, execution, and completion of a geographic information systems project for one of several clients. Students also exercise technical skills, develop the ability to work in a team environment, and develop negotiating and project management skills.

GIS 235. Cartographic Design and Analysis

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: GIS 105.
Typically Offered: FALL
The course incorporates the historical foundations of cartographic design and analysis with the digital age (GIS). Topics covered include the rapid changes in cartographic design driven by industry, data classification, advanced map design, generalization, multivariate mapping, and advanced thematic cartography through hands-on applications and case studies.

GIS 240. GIS Capstone

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: GIS 105, GIS 107 and GIS 201.
Typically Offered: SPRING
The course will demonstrate student knowledge and skills in geospatial technologies to a final GIS based project and presentation. Students will orally communicate results of a final professional level project. Projects will involve data collection and development, spatial analysis, cartographic design, digital image processing and other facets of project development and management of a large scale GIS project.

GIS 250. PET Applications in GIS

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: PET 115, GIS 105 and GIS 107.
Typically Offered: FALL
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in the petroleum industry. This laboratory course will explore several key application categories that span the upstream to downstream aspects of the industry. The examples are created from real world projects and the data are either actual project data or are modified to preserve confidentiality. Emphasis is placed on understanding and visualizing petroleum data in the GIS environment. The course will integrate the knowledge acquired in the PET curriculum to analyze and interpret the GIS results.

GIS 292. Experimental Course

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An experimental course is one that is being tested to determine its suitability for inclusion in the course catalog. Testing may continue for two semesters, after which the course should be discontinued or approved through the established college procedures, assigned a permanent course number and title, and included in the master catalog.

GIS 294. Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
An independent study course is one designed jointly by the student and faculty member to address an advanced topic of particular interest to the student and in the instructor's field of expertise. The course, when developed, must be approved by the department chair as being relevant to the discipline and of sufficient rigor for the credits to be awarded.

GIS 296. Study Tour

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Study Tour courses provide students with unique learning opportunities in locations, either foreign or domestic. These learning opportunities should be directly related to the academic field of study under which credits are to be awarded. Some students may not qualify for study tours if their travel abroad is restricted for legal reasons.

GIS 297. Cooperative Education/Internship

Credits: 1-3
Repeat Status: Repeatable up to 6.00 credits.
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Cooperative education and internships provide students with real-world experience in business and industry as they explore careers or gain experience in chosen fields of study. The work experiences must be directly related to the discipline under which the credits are to be awarded.

GIS 299. Special Topics

Credits: 1-3
Typically Offered: ONDEMAND
Special topics courses are developed by the faculty member to take advantage of unique learning opportunities that either are not repeatable (such as a presidential election) or address advanced topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Topics covered must be directly related to the discipline under which credits are to be awarded.